Inspired* new blog design

Okay, so my blog design mirrors another, probably better-coded site, but imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, right? And if that other blog has a problem with my appropriation of certain elements of its design, some from there should contact me, and I’ll go back to the ho-hum white and gray old version of this site. Until then, I’m going to enjoy working with and tweaking this new design.

Call this “Hypercrit 6.0.” (Wow, I can’t believe I’ve redesigned this site six times — that I’ve counted.)

Advertisements

Langeveld: Newspaper downturn caused by shift in American interests, not by Web

Martin Langeveld at the Nieman Journalism Lab writes that the real cause of the woes facing the newspaper industry is not the Web. Rather, it is the shifting and expanding American attention span.

Langeveld writes that the heyday of newspapers coincided with periods of the 20th century in which Americans were united in their passions and interests — the Great Depression, World War II, Korea, Vietnam. But the decades after have seen a boom in the number of luxuries and options available to Americans. Instead of every citizen focusing on the same issues, our range of interests has exploded.

It’s no wonder, then, that we can’t get more people to read the newspaper these days; there’s just not enough column inches to appeal to everyone.

The Web, Langeveld says, only accelerated this death spiral for the industry. It did not cause the spiral in the first place.

His advice to the news industry:

To have even a chance of survival, the mindset of the industry needs to become: We are in the business of publishing information content continuously on our web sites; every 24 hours (for now, and this may ultimately change to once or twice weekly) we gather some of that information into a printed product and distribute it, but our business is focused on and driven by our online operations.